H. Res. 316: H. Con. Res. 85 – Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2010 and including the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2009 and 2011 through 2014.

COMMITTEE ACTION: REPORTED BY A VOICE VOTE on April 1, 2009.
FLOOR ACTION: ADOPTED BY A RECORD VOTE OF 242 - 182 on Thursday, April 2, 2009.

MANAGERS: McGovern/Dreier

111th Congress 
1st Session

H.RES 316

[Report No. 111-73]

 

Providing for Further Consideration of H. Con. Res. 85 – Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2010

  1. Provides for further consideration of H. Con. Res. 85 under a structured rule.
  1. Provides that the concurrent resolution shall be considered as read.
  1. Makes in order only those amendments printed in the Rules Committee report accompanying the resolution.
  1. Provides that each amendment made in order may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, and shall be debatable for 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent.
  1. Waives all points of order against the amendments made in order.
  1. Provides that the adoption of any amendment in the nature of a substitute shall constitute completion of consideration of the concurrent resolution.
  1. Provides that the chair of the Committee on the Budget may offer amendments under section 305 of the Congressional Budget Act to achieve mathematical consistency.
  1. Provides that it shall be in order, after adoption of H. Con. Res. 85, for the Speaker to take from the table S. Con. Res. 13 and to consider S. Con. Res. 13 in the House without intervention of any point of order.  It shall be in order to move without intervention of any point of order to strike all after the resolving clause of S. Con. Res. 13 and insert in lieu thereof the provisions of H. Con. Res. 85 as passed by the House.  If the motion and Senate concurrent resolution are adopted, it shall be in order to move that the House insist on its amendment and request a conference with the Senate.

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RESOLUTION

            Resolved, That at any time after the adoption of this resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for further consideration of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 85) setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2010 and including the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2009 and 2011 through 2014. The concurrent resolution shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. The concurrent resolution shall be considered as read. No amendment shall be in order except those printed in the report of the Committee on Rules accompanying this resolution. Each amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, and shall be debatable for 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent. All points of order against the amendments printed in the report are waived except that the adoption of an amendment in the nature of a substitute shall constitute the conclusion of consideration of the concurrent resolution for amendment. After the conclusion of consideration of the concurrent resolution for amendment, the Committee shall rise and report the concurrent resolution to the House with such amendment as may have been adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the concurrent resolution and any amendment thereto to final adoption without intervening motion except amendments offered by the chair of the Committee on the Budget pursuant to section 305(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to achieve mathematical consistency. The concurrent resolution shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question of its adoption.

            Sec. 2. After adoption of House Concurrent Resolution 85 and receipt of a message from the Senate transmitting Senate Concurrent Resolution 13, it shall be in order to take from the Speaker's table Senate Concurrent Resolution 13 and to consider the Senate concurrent resolution in the House. All points of order against consideration of the Senate concurrent resolution are waived. It shall be in order to move to strike all after the resolving clause of the Senate concurrent resolution and to insert in lieu thereof the provisions of House Concurrent Resolution 85 as adopted by the House. All points of order against that motion are waived. The Senate concurrent resolution shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question of its adoption. If the motion is adopted and the Senate concurrent resolution, as amended, is adopted, then it shall be in order to move that the House insist on its amendment to the Senate concurrent resolution and request a conference with the Senate thereon.

SUMMARY OF AMENDMENTS TO BE MADE IN ORDER

(summaries derived from information provided by sponsors)

1. Woolsey, Lynn (CA)

The Progressive Caucus substitute budget provides $991 billion for non-military discretionary spending in FY10, $469 billion above President Obama’s request; provides $479 billion as sufficient defense spending level; and reduces the deficit by 58% by FY2012.  Savings come from eliminating Cold War era weapons systems, targeting waste, fraud, and abuse at the Pentagon,  military redeployment and military contractors out of Iraq, repeal of Bush tax cuts for those making more than $250,000 a year,  crackdown on corporate welfare and reinstating a quarter-cent tax (0.25%) on all stock transactions. Spending increases include health care for all Americans, cutting poverty in half in ten years, additional economic stimulus, increased Foreign Assistance, combating global warming and establishing energy independence, providing comprehensive education, and providing health care to veterans as an entitlement.

(40 minutes)

2. Jordan, Jim(OH)/Price, Tom(GA)/Pence, Mike(IN)

The RSC substitute budget sets spending levels, revenue levels, and deficit levels at lower amounts than what is projected by the CBO baseline or what is proposed in the President’s budget request.   The substitute provides defense funding at the President’s level and for non-defense discretionary spending, the RSC substitute provides a hard freeze to non-defense discretionary spending, plus a one percent reduction to prior year spending levels, and also assumes other savings from reductions to lower-priority spending. 

(40 minutes)

3. Lee, Barbara(CA)/Scott, Bobby (VA)

The CBC substitute budget builds upon the historic investments made by the President’s budget and the Majority’s budget.  However, the CBC budget builds on these investments by immediately repealing the 2001 and 2003 Bush-era tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans.  The CBC budget also adds an extremely modest 0.565% surtax on adjustable gross income exceeding $500,000 for individuals ($1 million for joint filers).  The CBC budget shifts those savings and additional revenue towards Education, Health Care, Job Training, International Aid, Justice, Transportation, and Veterans, while still producing a five year deficit that is $67 billion smaller than the Majority’s budget.

(40 minutes)

4. Ryan, Paul (WI)

 

The GOP substitute budget spends $4.8 trillion less than the Obama budget over 10 years. Backs spending down to 20.7% of GDP instead of 24.5% of GDP in the Obama budget.  Freezes non-defense/non-veterans spending; the Obama budget increases non-defense spending by over 9%. Borrows $3.6 trillion less than the Obama budget over 10 years and holds debt to 65% of GDP. Democrats have over 82% of GDP, nearly tripling it over 10-years.  Puts forward a long-term budget to bring debt under control. Avoids tax increases in 2010 by permanently extending 2001 and 2003 tax relief. Permanently fixes the Alternative Minimum Tax. Creates 2.1 million more Jobs than the Democrats’ Budget.  Suspends capital gains taxes through 2010 instead of higher taxes on investment in the Obama budget. Reduces corporate tax rate to 25% (from 35%, 2nd highest in the industrialized world) to make companies more competitive and create American jobs. Increases over the Obama budget: Defense by $5 billion; Veterans funding by $540. Reserves $50 billion annually for war or unmet defense needs. Provides for health and retirement security by reforming programs to ensure they provide benefits for future beneficiaries.

(40 minutes)